Tasmania’s Hillwood Strawberry Farm grows Seduberries

Tasmania’s Hillwood Strawberry Farm grows Seduberries

Seduberries - Josh EngwerdaSeduberries are the brainchild concept of young Melbourne entrepreneur Josh Engwerda 22, a student of Melbourne University in engineering and commerce. Mr Engwerda developed the concept after recalling an article about Japan’s cubeshaped watermelons. Josh spent $20,000 to see his idea bear fruit.

In developing the concept, Josh has trade marked the name and patented various aspects of the mould. The 10,000 perfectly formed strawberries were grown in the specially designed moulds, which were made in China and exported here where they were attached to the strawberries to make Seduberries.

SeduberriesThe strawberry moulds have also been adopted by Hillwood Strawberry Farm in north Launceston, Tasmania. In addition to the novel shape created as the berries grow and ripen, the plastic cases provide the berries protection from pest damage. The plastic cases have numerous ventilation points spread around the container which enables the fruit to grow in an aired environment and avoid problems caused by fungal disease.

The seduberry has been licensed in Europe with Davies Collison Cave Patent and Trade Mark Attorneys to ensure the appropriate overseas protection is in place.